Collaboration

As an educator, translator, and organizer, I’m a big believer in what Marc Fisher calls “mutually-supportive practice,” or, creative practice that dispenses with the tired enmities of competition and mastery. I recently finished  my dissertation, titled (E)co-Translation: Toward a Collective Task, on the ways that we might embrace an anti-imperialist, ecologically-oriented translation praxis through care work. In general, my research takes up questions of labor & collective action,  art & community making, the poetics & pragmatics of translation, and DIT (do-it-together) publishing as radical praxis. The introduction, “Dreaming the Collective: (E)co-translation in the Era of Climate Crisis,” is available here.

My path has been a winding one. Most recently, I served as Regional Director, Northern Midwest for the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research in Detroit. In 2019, I concluded an Arts Administration internship at the Scarab Club. In 2017-18, I was an In-Residence intern for 826michigan, where I  co-coordinated and facilitated in-school writing and translation programs in Ypsilanti, Michigan. On the literary side of things, I served as managing editor at Absinthe: World Literature in Translation for three years, and co-edited (with poet María Cristina Hall) a volume on women’s writing in Catalan, titled Barings // Bearings. I’ve overseen the creation of a letterpress anthology, published with Wolverine Press, for the Workshop in Literary Translation (UM), which I co-founded (with Emily Goedde) in 2013. I also teach my own Translation Workshop (Complit 322) every few semesters. Before that, I spent some time as an intern at the indie press Open Letter Books. Prior to beginning my PhD, I worked as an assistant editor for AsymptoteIn the ages floating before that, I was lucky enough to intern briefly for Words without Borders. And it all began with the undergrad literary translation magazine I founded in 2011: Canon Translation Review.

 Right now I’m spearheading the Emergent Translators Collective.